VIB. Bridging music, medicine, and compassion

"I was young when I faced the harsh reality of children, my age, my colour and no different to me were struggling with the basic aspects of life, while I had everything"
21 March 2024

In an exclusive interview, VIB discusses his latest track, Save A Life, inspired by his mother, grandmother, and auntie. His music, released via PRINCE MUSIC, intersects with his charity work, aiming to uplift underprivileged children globally.

As a fourth-year medical student, VIB balances studies with music, viewing both as vehicles for compassion. The success of his previous track, Speed Out, influences his latest release, For Robert, which addresses injustice and discrimination.

VIB’s music blends spoken word with rap elements, delivering messages of love and unity. Looking ahead, he plans to graduate medical school while continuing his musical journey.

In a world hungry for change, VIB’s music resonates, transcending boundaries and inspiring listeners with its authenticity and purpose.

Music cultivates in a place between the mind and body that we have no way of visualising with medicine or science, but can only try

Your new track Save A Life channels gratitude and wisdom from your mother, grandmother, and auntie. Could you elaborate on how these influences shaped the song and your overall approach to music?

To say influences would be an understatement, these three angels provided my with every aspect of my approach to life, from happiness to sadness, from struggle to triumph and facing both people who wish the best for in conjunction with people who don’t with a loving compassionate lens. They embodied the words power, passion and resilience and stepped with graciousness throughout their struggles. More than shaping the song or my approach to music, they shaped my approach to life.

“More than shaping the song or my approach to music, they shaped my approach to life.”

In addition to your music career, you also operate the charity Vib Save Children, which aims to enhance the lives of underprivileged children. How does your charitable work intersect with your artistic pursuits, and what motivated you to initiate it at such a young age?

Art was initially an outlet for the injustice I have seen in my home Sri Lanka and many less privileged places around the world. I was young when I faced the harsh reality of children, my age, my colour and no different to me were struggling with the basic aspects of life, while I had everything. This was heartbreaking to me as the injustice in the distribution of basic human rights and comfort was prominent. So I  started with poetry to voice my heart on these emotions and published anthologies to sell and raise funds for these heavy hearts when I was 11, with the help of my mum. From there we managed to establish the charity and continued through fundraising and my current music, using these funds to build schools, install water pumps, pay teachers wages and provide basic resources that people lack but are entitled to as humans.

As a fourth-year medical student, how do you balance your studies with your music career and charity work? Do you find any overlap between your roles in music and medicine?


My passion for medicine came from the same place as the charity, where I had a deep desire to change the lives of these less fortunate souls in any positive way I could and was hoping through medicine I could one day run free clinics for areas deprived of medical resources with the charity. Music has overlap with everything in life; there is a beautiful symmetry between the physics in music and the physiology of the human body. Music cultivates in a place between the mind and body that we have no way of visualising with medicine or science, but can only try.  But each in their own respect form a symphony of vibration and motion which was have the privilege to study and explore.  I have been able to balance these aspects as they feed into each other and fuel the same motive of effort towards lightening the heavy hearts of our less fortunate brothers and sisters with love and compassion.

“I was young when I faced the harsh reality of children, my age, my colour and no different to me were struggling with the basic aspects of life, while I had everything.”

Your previous single Speed Out gained recognition on BBC Introducing. How has that success influenced your approach to your latest release, For Robert, both musically and thematically?

I was honoured to gain recognition for the track from BBC introducing and other outlets and extend my deepest gratitude and blessings to everyone who listened for making the vision get one step closer to being a reality. After the track has been picked up the next few releases were definitely strategised to be able to maximise outreach with the help of my amazing team music gateway. For Robert was a track that was very close to my heart and addressed the racism and injustice that is prevalent in air all over the world in many shapes and forms, emphasising discrimination of the colour and race of individuals specifically. So the main push for ‘For Robert’, was making sure that his story was heard over anything bringing it to light.

For Robert deals with the injustice of a man who was wrongly convicted. What motivated you to talk about this matter in your music, and what message do you hope people take away from the song and its accompanying visuals?

This is a topic that is very close to my heart and I wish to emphasise through this track that, these labels in society of race, colour and creed cause division and hurt and is an endless cycle giving rise to hate. Love is more natural to the heart and love will light the way in any scenario. The majority choose to see people for their labels using just their eyes, but if one chose to look through their heart, the world would be a beautiful place. I will always strive against injustice of any kind and this is the main point of my music as a whole; to be a voice for the silenced

Your music often blends spoken word with contemporary rap elements. Can you share more about your creative process when crafting your unique sound, and what influences inspire your lyrical content?

I couldn’t tell you what first propagated this type of blend but I think it has something to do with my love of poetry and studying greats of poetry and spoken word like the likes of Maya Angelou for example. Music, rap and spoken word are one in the same, each respectively powerful, but in unison a vessel for touching hearts. In terms of the process, it is always what does the lyrics and the meaning behind them the most justice how it can be delivered to hearts of people in the most emphatic way. My lyrical influences would endlessly extensive, from every genre of music, spoken word and poetry to speeches of freedom fighters, pioneers of justice and pioneers of human rights.

Where do you see yourself in five years, both musically and personally?

Music is just a platform for me to be able to get a place where I can speak about these worldly issues and not only bring them to light but to share a certain perspective of loving compassion where these labels in society are overlooked and to see the beauty in the oneness of the one human heart and soul to another. Striving to be a voice for those silenced and promoting love at every junction as that is what makes the heart of the world less heavy.

Where do you think your music fits in today’s world?

Exactly where it will need to fit to hit the hearts of those who it is meant to hit.

In case you were stuck on a desert island, which three albums would you select to find washed up on the shore?

This is probably the hardest question on here.

  1. Motown Greatest hits
  2. Kind of blues – Miles Davis
  3. Exodus – Bob Marley
  4. 2014 Forest Hill’s Drive – J Cole
  5. All-Amerikkkan – Bada$$

I’m sorry I couldn’t pick three

What are your plans for the rest of this year?

Keep pushing with the message through the music, and hopefully, graduate medical school and get to the beginning of the journey.

©FM

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vibsavechildren.org